WIKTORIA SZAWIEL - WHAT IS THE LIMIT OF FANTASY? 

Is it something completely known and certain? Is it reason, order, rules? The norm or rational imperatives? 

Thinking in images - the logical structure, the line, the grid, the frame? 

Does fantasy end with repetition – systematic, methodical and efficient?

The logic of weaving, for example, repeating the same movements, the same pattern, between the same number of lines, a systematically growing structure based on focus and repetition. The frame laced tightly with yarn, the thread creating a repetitive pattern, every 2, every 3, every 4 warps etc, no mistake is allowed. The beauty found in pattern, the beauty of organisation, the beauty of structure. The beauty reveals itself in repetition. 

The order of weaving a basket - expanding regular round base to which an even amount of wicker rods are attached. The wicker straws methodically and systematically interwoven between the vertical rods. Growing steadily. The more accurate, regular, even and symmetric the better the final result is. Can it be too systematic, too regular? Repetition too methodical, too logical, too efficient? Transforming into disoriented, irrational, absurd and out of reason? 

What is the limit of fantasy? Can one let go within a grid? In a comfort zone of structure and order? From methodic to meditation?  Where one is led by intuition and gut, crossing the border of rational. Entering an almost hypnotic or trance state? Could it be in the limits that the fantasy is born?

From rigid repetition of movement to organic growth of form, one the maker cannot predict and doesn’t control completely. A process of dialogue with the material over the final outcome. For these experimental, partially cast in resin, partially left intact woven vessels, I chose to show the process in an exaggerated and bordering on absurd way.  The forms became deformed, cut and distorted. The shapes are bodily but not recognisable and the function is not clear. The final result becomes ambivalent and somehow puzzling, posing a question on our perception of the idea of a vessel.

 

 IMAGE BY GALI BLAY

IMAGE BY GALI BLAY